At a window by carl sandburg

They may have had struggles in the field of love throughout the course of their life.

At a window by carl sandburg

O little roses And broken leaves And petal wisps: You that so flung your crimson To the sun Only yesterday. The chippies talk about the funnies in the papers. There is a hog in me … a snout and a belly … a machinery for eating and grunting … a machinery for sleeping satisfied in the sun—I got this too from the wilderness and the wilderness will not let it go. Ship riveters talk with their feet To the feet of floozies under the tables. O, I got a zoo, I got a menagerie, inside my ribs, under my bony head, under my red-valve heart—and I got something else: it is a man-child heart, a woman-child heart: it is a father and mother and lover: it came from God-Knows-Where: it is going to God-Knows-Where—For I am the keeper of the zoo: I say yes and no: I sing and kill and work: I am a pal of the world: I came from the wilderness. He says this with desire and makes his plea very unusual, but in the second stanza switches up with what he wants in return for his pain which is love. Good things come to he who waits. They will endure hardships in order to have love in their life. But the iteration of the "day shapes of dusk" suggests that there is perhaps more than one voice this persona is hearing, more than one "little love" for which he or she is waiting. Carl Sandburg. The person could have been cast aside in the world and is trying to find hope in the situation. Online College Education is now free!

A quartet of white hopes mourn with interspersed snickers: "I got the blues. O, I got a zoo, I got a menagerie, inside my ribs, under my bony head, under my red-valve heart—and I got something else: it is a man-child heart, a woman-child heart: it is a father and mother and lover: it came from God-Knows-Where: it is going to God-Knows-Where—For I am the keeper of the zoo: I say yes and no: I sing and kill and work: I am a pal of the world: I came from the wilderness.

at a window poem analysis

The theme of this poem is romantic and touches on the importance of having someone who loves you. Definition terms.

Timesweep by carl sandburg

There is a hog in me … a snout and a belly … a machinery for eating and grunting … a machinery for sleeping satisfied in the sun—I got this too from the wilderness and the wilderness will not let it go. Or a reflection of that still, small spiritual voice with which the gods speak to us all at our own windows? If the "little wandering, western star" is an objective correlative for the intuition of supreme love--perhaps the love of the gods to whom the initial request for hunger was made--then it is instructive that the persona turns his attention away from it to the "day-shapes of dusk" and the "coming of a little love. Last edited by SwiftSleigh7; at AM. Humans collectively feel the need to have a significant other to feel they have a place. The trombone pony neighs and the tuba jackass snorts. They were very poor and Sandburg dropped out of school at an early age to work odd jobs. The chippies talk about the funnies in the papers. Carl Sandburg. In the dusk of day-shapes Blurring the sunset, One little wandering, western star Thrust out from the changing shores of shadow. Thank you for bringing this poem to my attention. Carl Sandburg Wilderness There is a wolf in me … fangs pointed for tearing gashes … a red tongue for raw meat … and the hot lapping of blood—I keep this wolf because the wilderness gave it to me and the wilderness will not let it go. Ship riveters talk with their feet To the feet of floozies under the tables. Posted on by a guest.

And he doesn't ask for much, not a throng of admirers, no, he will be sattisfied with one little star, somehow special from all the others, thrust out from changing shores of shadow.

I have never noticed Sanburg's seemingly anti-Hedonistic and transcendental-according-to-love views until being shown this particular work. They were very poor and Sandburg dropped out of school at an early age to work odd jobs. You are quite right to note the anti-hedonism inherent in this quatrain.

Due to Spam Posts are moderated before posted. O little roses And broken leaves And petal wisps: You that so flung your crimson To the sun Only yesterday.

at a window by carl sandburg answer key

In comparison to the other two poems that I analyzed, this poem compares with them in that it leaves a little bit of hope. This is my favorite piece by Carl, although I have yet to read all of his.

Quick fast explanatory summary.

Carl sandburg themes

Carl Sandburg. There is an eagle in me and a mockingbird … and the eagle flies among the Rocky Mountains of my dreams and fights among the Sierra crags of what I want … and the mockingbird warbles in the early forenoon before the dew is gone, warbles in the underbrush of my Chattanoogas of hope, gushes over the blue Ozark foothills of my wishes—And I got the eagle and the mockingbird from the wilderness. Truly, its expression has its highs and lows, so to speak, but does this add or subtract from its infinite and pure intuition? The second stanza says, "But leave me a little love, a voice to speak to me in the day end, a hand to touch me in the dark room Even more admirable, he is willing to go and watch and wait. Give me hunger, pain and want, Shut me out with shame and failure From your doors of gold and fame, Give me your shabbiest, weariest hunger! Or a reflection of that still, small spiritual voice with which the gods speak to us all at our own windows? O little roses And broken leaves And petal wisps: You that so flung your crimson To the sun Only yesterday. O, I got a zoo, I got a menagerie, inside my ribs, under my bony head, under my red-valve heart—and I got something else: it is a man-child heart, a woman-child heart: it is a father and mother and lover: it came from God-Knows-Where: it is going to God-Knows-Where—For I am the keeper of the zoo: I say yes and no: I sing and kill and work: I am a pal of the world: I came from the wilderness. The chippies talk about the funnies in the papers. Love is overpowering and can mask the loneliness some may feel. Does love necessarily have its own nature, comparable to the sun's set and rise? In comparison to the other two poems that I analyzed, this poem compares with them in that it leaves a little bit of hope. You are quite right to note the anti-hedonism inherent in this quatrain.
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At A Window Poem by Carl Sandburg