Writing a setting description year 6 sats

Many pupils wrote a lot, perhaps more than necessary. The attacking creature could be: dangerous predator, vile beast, large cat etc.

setting description examples year 3

The class might then be asked to actually pick out words and phrases from the text that back up their opinion. A teacher will spend a few days reading the story to the children and giving them tasks that help to deepen their understanding of it.

Pupils numbered Post-its with bullet points. In 'Wild Ride', there is a mention of the setting again right at the end 'thatched house and mango trees' - this is an example of cohesion as it links the end and beginning. Here a teacher might ask the class to think of a word to sum up the mood of the setting; replies might include: 'dismal', 'depressing', 'scary', 'miserable'.

Descriptive writing success criteria year 6

In this story, there should be synonyms for the creature the child is riding and for the attacking creature. Pupils numbered Post-its with bullet points. Next, I showed the winter scene below and pupils worked in groups to write a description. A teacher will choose an engaging story to read the children and they will then look at how the setting is described in the story. The teacher might also draw attention to the fact that we are given a feel for four senses: sight, sound, touch and smell. I told pupils to think about their idea that evening and maybe discuss it with someone at home and or do some internet research. In 'Wild Ride', there is a mention of the setting again right at the end 'thatched house and mango trees' - this is an example of cohesion as it links the end and beginning.

They might be asked why these similes have been used and why they are effective. The teacher may also pick up on the use of similes and see if the children can spot them 'skin seemed as thin as dusty paper' and 'paint was peeling and cracking like dry earth'.

Writing a setting description year 6 sats

Please let me hear your feedback and suggestions in the comments sections below. In both examples, the 'ride' was of a vehicle. The reason for doing so is that they can avoid confusion between the pronouns 'he' and 'she'. A story setting is the location in which a story takes place. I also paid attention to cohesion. Children might be asked to find references to each of these four senses. It would be wonderful if you could share the article on social media and help me to grow Unicorn Writing to help other educators. There were only three other children in detention, who scribbled manically on their papers and did not dare look up for a second. The setting could be a school, someone's home, a witch's lair or Mars! What is a story setting?

The desk felt grainy and chalky under her sweaty palms. Another boy had a soldier living on a terraformed Mars. At this point, the teacher would want to encourage them to think about how the author had described setting and to use the same strategies themselves.

Literary language, e.

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Story setting explained for parents